Talk to Vascular Physicians in Lake Charles, LA about CVI

Chronic venous insufficiency, or CVI, occurs when the venous wall or the valves in the veins of the legs are not working correctly. As a result, the blood has trouble flowing to the heart from the legs. As a result, CVI causes blood to collect or pool in the veins. When this happens, the pooling is referred to as stasis.

How CVI Develops

According to vascular physicians in Lake Charles, LA, CVI occurs when the leg valves become damaged, which causes the blood to leak in a backward direction. This damage may result from extended periods of standing or sitting or as a result of the aging process. When the veins or valves in the legs have weakened in this way, the blood pressure in the veins also remains elevated for a long period of time.

Vascular physicians add that CVI commonly occurs when a blood clot forms in the deep veins of the legs. The development of this condition is called deep vein thrombosis, or DVT. CVI may also develop from vascular abnormalities or pelvic tumors. In some instances, the cause is unknown. When the valves in the leg veins no longer can hold the blood against the forces of gravity, the circulation becomes sluggish and the legs swell.

Are You at Risk for CVT?

According to vascular physicians, when CVI develops from DVT, it is referred to as post-thrombotic syndrome. People who currently have DVT will develop CVI within ten years of being diagnosed with DVT. Your risk factors increase for developing CVI if one or more of the following apply:

  • A diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT)
  • Pregnancy
  • Obesity
  • An inactive lifestyle
  • Smoking
  • You are female
  • You are over 50 years old
  • You sit or stand for extended periods of time

Where to Learn More about CVI

If you have varicose veins that have not been treated, you can develop CVI too. That is why—if any of the above risk factors apply to you should learn more about CVI. You can find out more about this condition by visiting a website such as veincenterla.com. Visit the site to see what you can do to prevent or treat this condition.

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